ACR ARTEX

The Science Of Survival


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April 6th or 4/06/2018 = 406Day Beacon Awareness Day | 406 MHz Beacons Save Lives so #406Day18 !

Why is 406Day Beacon Awareness Day ? 

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Because 406 MHz Beacons Save Lives!

406 MHz  beacon technology has saved over 41,000 lives worldwide since the mid 1980’s! This link to ACR’s SurvivorClub  (You use it – we replace it program) will take you to real life testimonies.

406Day is a national awareness day used to spread the word on beacons, and as a supporter of aviation, boating or possibly outdoor safety we ask you to use your social media platforms to do just that.

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Whether you use Facebook, Instagram, YouTube or Twitter, you can keep your posts in the conversation by adding #406Day18.

To help explain how you can promote 406Day; it would best help to understand the four pillars of 406Day which are: Education, Awareness, Celebration and Promotion.

Education – focuses on current beacon owners. This is the day to remind them to check for an expired battery, update their registration, make sure their beacon is properly mounted and test their beacon. If they are in Florida and own a boat, we remind them that they qualify for the Beacon Bill discount.

Awareness – we explain how beacons work. In aviation we talk about the benefits of 406 MHz over just 121.5 MHz. READ. For PLBs, we discuss how they are different from a cell phone or a VHF radio. There are no monthly or administrative fees.

Celebration – a day to celebrate the lives saved by beacons. See: (SurvivorClub). There couldn’t be a better day to thank Search and Rescue Crews.

Promotion – inspire individuals to buy a beacon through emotional appeal. We ask them to show us “where your beacon frees them to go” or share a photo that reminds them “why you have a beacon”. Use #406Day18 in your posts.

Beacons come in three forms:

  1. (AVIATION) for ELT information reference this site: https://www.acrartex.com/products/catalog/elts-commercialmilitary/elt4000/#sthash.jULJlzcA.dpbs
  2. (OUTDOORS) for PLB information reference this site: https://www.acrartex.com/support/faqs/personal-locator-beacon-faqs/
  3. (BOATING) for EPIRB information reference this site: https://www.acrartex.com/support/faqs/epirb-faqs/
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International Women’s Day

On International Women’s Day – a global day for celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women ACR Electronics, Inc. would like to recognize and thank our Vice President of Finance, Yuliya Varabei for her leadership and commitment.

For the past 5 years Yuliya has demonstrated leadership at ACR, supported her community through her efforts with the Greater Fort Lauderdale Chamber of Commerce, led area business development with the Beacon Council, promoted education with her Alma mater Florida International University all while also nurturing her wonderful family.

Yuliya to her coworkers is most notably recognized for her support in developing ACR’s one-of-a-kind internal peer mentoring program and for building a corporate culture which is unique to the manufacturing industry. She continually enforces ACR Electronics mission through all aspects of business by making it clear that here at ACR Electronics “We build products knowing they are used to save lives”.

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#internationalwomensday


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Top 5 common misconceptions about 406 MHz beacons

Top 5 common misconceptions about 406 MHz beacons

1.  I Thought Beacons cost over $1,000?
Not any more, EPIRBs start at just $399.99 and Personal Locator Beacons (PLBs) start at just $259.99.  Here are few things you spend on your boat/outdoor gear each year that cost more and won’t save your life:  Gas for your boat, bait and beer, fishing rods, tents, scopes and amunition!

2. Isn’t my boat too small for an EPIRB?
Every boat should have some kind of 406 MHz distress beacon.  If you have a small boat like a kayak, SUP, canoe, bass boat or even a pontoon boat, consider a Personal Locator Beacon.  If you are going offshore, an EPIRB is the right beacon.  Smaller boats typically prefer the manual release category 2 bracket, while larger boats enjoy the automatic release and activation of a category 1 bracket.

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3.  How can an EPIRB or PLB help me go boating, hiking, fishing, etc., more?
Does your wife/husband/fiancé/mom/kids/Etc. ever worry about you going offshore, into the woods, or off the beaten path?  Sure they do!!!  Introduce them to our beacon technology and educate them on how it can save you should something unexpected happen while you are away.  We like to call this Peace of Mind, and when they worry less, you get outside more!!

4. EPIRBs and PLBs are only for if my boat sinks, My boat won’t sink!
EPIRBs and PLBs are for more than sinking boats. They are for life threatening emergencies.  We have survivors that have had medical emergencies, have come across someone else that needs assistance, boat fires, snake bites, we have even had two different incidents with boats hitting whales.  The fact is, anything can happen, EPIRBs and Personal Locator Beacons are designed to ensure you get home safely no matter what mother nature has in store for you.

5. I Hate Subscription Fees and I don’t want another one!
So do we.  406 MHz beacons don’t require any service subscriptions.  They work directly with the Cospas-Sarsat satellites which are government run and are a direct link to Search and Rescue.  There are no subscriptions required, the only thing required is to register your beacon with your national authority (it’s Free).  We do offer an option testing subscription service called www.406link.com (USA Only), but its optional only if you want to receive testing confirmation via email/SMS text message.


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ACR AIS Improves Safety for Outer Banks Fishermen

P3130061.jpgThe Customer

Captain Greg Mayer and his crew fish in the dangerous waters of the Outer Banks in Fishin’ Frenzy, a 53-foot Custom Carolina Sportfish. Well known for their role on popular National Geographic Channel show ‘Wicked Tuna: Outer Banks’, Greg and his crew spend their time targeting tuna, marlin, sailfish, wahoo, and dolphin.

 

Experienced fisherman Greg has been fishing professionally for more than 25 years and has been at the helm of the Fishin’ Frenzy since 1999. The 1977-built vessel is well-equipped and maintained to give customers the safest, most comfortable, offshore fishing experience possible. However, they still required an extra level of safety to add to equipment already in place, which includes ACR Electronics GlobalFix™ iPRO Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB),  HemiLight™3 flashing survival light and C-Strobe™ with C-Clip, plus two VHF radios, satellite telephone, two GPS units, autopilot, radar and depth sounder.

Captain Greg Mayer and the crew of Fishin’ Frenzy

The Problem

For the past few winters, Captain Greg and his crew have spent many hours on the ocean, often staying out overnight. They frequently have to deal with foggy conditions and poor visibility and usually operate in areas with a high amount of ship traffic in close proximity. Although there is always a crew member on watch and they are often communicating with other boats in the area, they wanted to further enhance their safety measures for added reassurance and peace of mind.

Greg highlights the dangers facing his vessel and others following a very close call in the fog recently. He said: “I identified a radar target as a tug and tow, calculated his heading and slowed down to let him pass.  About 20 minutes later, a fellow fisherman was a few miles behind me with no radar. He heard the tug, and narrowly missed running between the tug and tow. Had I had AIS, I could have identified the tug and informed my colleague exactly where the tug was located and direction to avoid any confusion whatsoever.”

Fishin’ Frenzy, now equipped with ACR AIS technology

The Solution

Greg wanted to make sure he could see other vessels, as well as be seen on the water, in order to increase his navigational safety. Enhancing the information he already receives with radar, the Fishin’ Frenzy captain also wanted to be able to view and track local traffic on a clear graphical interface, identify other boats, check their course and movements and establish whether he is in danger.

Therefore Greg decided to install ACR Electronics’ AISLink CA1 Class A transceiver, which demonstrates the highest AIS transmission power and the most frequent transmission of AIS information. The device enables him to send and receive wireless data to and from nearby AIS-equipped vessels including the vessel’s name, position, course or speed over the ground, heading and rate of turn. It helps the crew to keep the vessel clear of local maritime traffic and provides reassurance that Fishin’ Frenzy is visible to other vessels. Offering high reliability, performance, and compliance with regulations at a competitive price, the AISLink CA1 facilitates faster communication and navigational planning especially when vessels are hidden or obstructed from radar.

Installation was a straightforward process as the Class A device is a ‘one box’ design containing both the transceiver and display, with an external junction box provided to simplify connection of sensor and display data wiring. Greg opted to interface the AIS with his chart plotter, enabling him to view the data in a convenient, clear format. Each ship symbol on the display reveals the ship name, course and speed, classification, call sign, registration number and MMSI. Greg can calculate and predict the closest point of approach (CPA), which is the minimum distance his vessel will be from the target according to current speed and course. In this way, he will have the given time of the intercept and the distance. Fishin’ Frenzy now also has the ability to send and receive AIS text messages and set active target-specific AIS system alarms to provide advance warning. In areas of high congestion, Fishin’ Frenzy can filter and prioritize targets so that the navigator is aware of the vessels which pose a collision risk.

Captain Greg commented: “The added visibility provided by AIS is another measure of safety that I feel is invaluable with the amount of ship traffic in the area. It will be very reassuring to have this extra back up. Winter fishing on the Outer Banks is no time to be unprepared for whatever the ocean may throw at you. When my crew’s safety is on the line, I depend on ACR.”

Chart plotter view with AIS installed allowing the captain to view and track local traffic

Visit www.aismandate.com for more information about AIS (Automatic Identification System) and the new USCG (United States Coast Guard) AIS mandate or go to www.ACRARTEX.com.

 


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EPIRB’s Durability Proven Under the Hottest Conditions  

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Photo caption: This Emergency Position-Indicating Radio (EPIRB) Beacon was on board a boat during an electrical fire.

After this EPIRB was charred during an electrical fire on-board the vessel “Sunshine Too,” Captain Keith Mc Farlane questioned whether the EPIRB was still able to function. Not wanting to take a chance, he sent the EPIRB to ACR for evaluation.  As part of ACR’s standard testing procedures,  we completed a full range of performance testing on the beacon. All the test results proved the EPIRB was still working – perfectly. This is another demonstration proving ACR Electronics indeed builds quality products knowing they are used to save lives.

 


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Introducing the New ARTEX ELT 1000 Emergency Locator Transmitter with Built-In GPS Navigational Interface

Fort Lauderdale, FL – ACR Electronics, Inc. announces today that the all-new ELT 1000 (Emergency Locator Transmitter) has received its Cospas-Sarsat and FAA approvals and is now available for sale. The ARTEX ELT 1000 is competitively priced and designed with multiple installation configurations to reduce overall installation cost.

The state of the art electronics maximize frequency stability and power while incorporating a new, built-in GPS navigational interface. Including GPS data in the emergency transmission allows Search and Rescue personnel to know your location within 100 meters in less than a minute. Designed to accommodate multiple installation configurations, the new ELT 1000 is a quick, easy and affordable retrofit for obsolete 121.5 MHz ELTs.

ELT100_ISO_2Built under the exacting standards of AS9100C quality certification, the ELT 1000 exceeds all government and regulatory standards including the latest FAA guidelines with its new robust stainless steel mounting strap.

The ARTEX ELT 1000 features and specifications are listed below:

  • Quick and easy retrofit for general aviation aircraft
  • Single antenna output for emergency transmission on both 406 MHz (Cospas-Sarsat) and 121.5 MHz frequencies (local Search & Rescue)
  • Enhanced positional accuracy with a built-in GPS interface that does not require aircraft power
  • Encoded digital message broadcasts aircraft identification/registration and owner/emergency contact details
  • New stainless steel mounting strap for increased stability that complies with the most current FAA guidelines
  • Simple self-testing from the cockpit. When combined with 406Test.com, the self-test will provide SMS/e-mail confirmation within seconds that the ELT signal reached the satellites successfully
  • New hermetically sealed G-Switch for increased reliability

ARTEX designs and manufactures an array of ELT’s, battery packs and ELT accessories. ARTEX products serve a wide category of aircrafts ranging from general aviation to the world’s leading airframe manufacturers, large commercial airlines and government aircraft.


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Len & Lisa, ACR Survivors Use TWO Beacons for TWO Different Rescues

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ACR Electronics shares a first: within just six months a SurvivorClub replacement Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB) saves a crew of three and their dog from the raging seas of the North Atlantic.

Just this past October, and without warning, Len and Lisa Rorke’s sailboat rudder broke and drifted away leaving the sailboat without any means of steering, forcing Len to activate their EPIRB. Their ACR GlobalFix iPRO EPIRB signal was received by the USCG who coordinated their rescue with a local fishing trawler which was 20 miles away. The good Samaritans aboard the trawler pulled the Rorkes, and their Jack Russell Terrier, Dexter, up on board and took them back to safety.

To everyone’s shock and disbelief not even six months later, lightning struck again. This time the couple, Dexter and a crew mate Henri Worthalter were 13 days into crossing the Atlantic Ocean, from the Turks and Caicos Islands, heading to the Mediterranean via The Azores. Their journey ended with two days of gale force winds and high seas which broke the rudder and aft bulkhead on their sailboat,The Blue Pearl. “We were 950 nautical miles from the Azores (about halfway between the Azores and Bermuda), and could not have been further from land if we tried. We had been battling heavy weather for a week and the last two days of storms battered our boat so badly that it sank right in the middle of the North Atlantic in huge seas, strong winds and in the dead of night”, stated Len, Captain of The Blue Pearl.

ImageForced into a life raft 900 miles north of Bermuda, the couple watched as their home sank before their eyes.  As fate would have it, their new EPIRB given to them just months before by ACR Electronics as part of the SurvivorClub program was put to proper use.  They activated the EPIRB once they got into their life raft and within minutes the EPIRB sent the USCG the exact location of the displaced crew.

The USCG District Command Center located two ships to help with the rescue the Tilda Kosan, a 351′ tanker, which was 32 nautical miles to the south of their position and an automated mutual-assistance vessel rescue ship (AMVER). The tanker reported they were six hours away from the EPIRB’s location and would divert off course to assist the distressed mariners. Around 12:30 a.m. the tanker located the life raft with Len, Lisa, Henri and Dexter whom the USCG previously identified.

Clearly relieved, Len said “We were extremely lucky to have survived but that luck came because we did everything right and without a question because we had properly registered our EPIRB, once again, with the US Coast Guard.”

Rescued, recovered but now homeless, the Rorkes are in good and grateful spirits despite watching their sailboat, their home just drop to the bottom of the ocean.  Their crewmate, Henri returned home to Europe but the Rorkes and Dexter were transported to Bermuda and then flown into South Florida. Currently they are residing at a good Samaritan’s home in Jupiter, FL while regrouping and raising money to join their family in the United Kingdom.

To read both of the Rorke’s survival stories please visit SurvivorClub.com.

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