ACR ARTEX

The Science Of Survival


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ACR Electronics Supports Windsurf Round Britain

ACR Electronics sponsored Jono completed his windsurfing trip around Britain trip at Clacton. Although this is a first attempt at a Windsurf round Britain without boat support, Jono had strong product support and endorsement and ACR Electronics is proud to be one of them. As well as being the first person to do this without an on-water support boat, so far Jono has also raised £3,500 for Pancreatic Cancer and £1,500 for Supporting Tanzanian Orphans and Widows, the two charities he set out to support and raise awareness for.

To learn more about Jono and his adventure please visit http://www.windsurfroundbritain.co.uk
Also please note these links below for some additional coverage of Jono’s trip:

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/news/uk/article4554707.ece

http://www.windsurfroundbritain.co.uk/update/last-leg

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-essex-34226047

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-essex-34237999

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/11860824/Daredevil-completes-his-bid-to-windsurf-around-Britain.html


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Rescued at Sea!

Meet Mr. Cook and read his first hand survival story:

We left the boat ramp Sunday morning at 4am in search of Dolphin and Sailfish, and we rode out to Georgetown Hole (about 60nm East of Charleston, SC) without any problems at 20-25 kts. Both bilge pumps were working, both bilges stayed dry for the ride. About 20 minutes after we started fishing, the boat took on too much water and quickly sank out from under us.

While I don’t know exactly what caused the boat to sink, my guess is this:

Once we slowed down to trolling speed, the waves were spaced out to where we would take a wave over the bow every once in a while, but nothing that seemed too terrible. I’m guessing that the waves coming over the bow filled all of the bow lockers, and those small drains were blocked by leaves and/or all the gear inside the lockers.

I think that once the water in the lockers weighed the bow down, any water in the bilge drained to the bow, away from the pumps. It seemed like it happened so fast at this point — once the bow got heavy, it plowed more, causing more water to collect in the bilge, making it heavier, in turn causing it to take more water over the bow. Before we knew it, there was standing water on the deck. We cut all of the lines that were out and I got one, maybe two Mayday calls out from the boat’s VHF. Everyone got their life jackets on and I grabbed the ACR ditch bag (emergency bag) that I keep readily available, at arms length right on top of the console.

Once we were in the water, the boat was completely gone almost immediately. We all stayed together. I got the handheld VHF and the PLB out of the ditch bag and resumed communication with the CG. I was a little worried at first since they wouldn’t verify that they were seeing my beacon — they were asking me to deploy a device that had already been deployed. That was probably the worst feeling of the day. After about 10 minutes, they said they saw the signal, and broadcast our coordinates on the radio. Communication was tough from a handheld — since VHF is Line of Sight, you lose comms when you are right on the water and in the trough of a wave.

Luckily 2 boats were in the area and headed our way. The Office out of Georgetown got to us first, and picked us up. The CG chopper arrived a little while later, and the CG vessel made it out to pick us up and take us home.

Aside from the obvious, everything went really well. It was less than 1 hour from the first Mayday call until we were on board The Office. The crew stayed composed and nobody panicked. The fact that this happened in June instead of January was a blessing. I can’t thank the boats that responded enough for their support. Larry, Tom, and Charlie (the crew of The Office) were incredibly accommodating, and offered us water, gatorade and food if we needed. They were running a charter, and pulled lines in to run over and help us.

– See more at: https://www.acrartex.com/survivors/stories/2015/cook-north-charleston-south-carolina#sthash.VmEyUiRA.dpuf


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Introducing the New ARTEX ELT 1000 Emergency Locator Transmitter with Built-In GPS Navigational Interface

Fort Lauderdale, FL – ACR Electronics, Inc. announces today that the all-new ELT 1000 (Emergency Locator Transmitter) has received its Cospas-Sarsat and FAA approvals and is now available for sale. The ARTEX ELT 1000 is competitively priced and designed with multiple installation configurations to reduce overall installation cost.

The state of the art electronics maximize frequency stability and power while incorporating a new, built-in GPS navigational interface. Including GPS data in the emergency transmission allows Search and Rescue personnel to know your location within 100 meters in less than a minute. Designed to accommodate multiple installation configurations, the new ELT 1000 is a quick, easy and affordable retrofit for obsolete 121.5 MHz ELTs.

ELT100_ISO_2Built under the exacting standards of AS9100C quality certification, the ELT 1000 exceeds all government and regulatory standards including the latest FAA guidelines with its new robust stainless steel mounting strap.

The ARTEX ELT 1000 features and specifications are listed below:

  • Quick and easy retrofit for general aviation aircraft
  • Single antenna output for emergency transmission on both 406 MHz (Cospas-Sarsat) and 121.5 MHz frequencies (local Search & Rescue)
  • Enhanced positional accuracy with a built-in GPS interface that does not require aircraft power
  • Encoded digital message broadcasts aircraft identification/registration and owner/emergency contact details
  • New stainless steel mounting strap for increased stability that complies with the most current FAA guidelines
  • Simple self-testing from the cockpit. When combined with 406Test.com, the self-test will provide SMS/e-mail confirmation within seconds that the ELT signal reached the satellites successfully
  • New hermetically sealed G-Switch for increased reliability

ARTEX designs and manufactures an array of ELT’s, battery packs and ELT accessories. ARTEX products serve a wide category of aircrafts ranging from general aviation to the world’s leading airframe manufacturers, large commercial airlines and government aircraft.


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ACR Electronics declares April 6th (4/06) to be “406 MHz Beacon Awareness Day” and ACR is asking our beacon owners, survivors and partners to help spread the word and share their stories! The *406 MHz technology has saved 35,000 lives since early 1980’s, certainly a statistic to be celebrated! Visit http://www.survivorclub.com to read some first-hand testimonies.

Please do your part to promote 406 MHz beacon use by sharing your specially tailored message and photo on your social media accounts. Tell everyone what your PLB or EPIRB frees you to do. Include a picture of the activity or place where your beacon gives you the confidence and freedom to go. ACR will be giving random participants prizes for sharing their 406 MHz message.

How to enter?

Tweet or Facebook post titled “what my 406 beacon frees me to do”. Include a picture of the activity or place your beacon gives you the confidence and freedom to go.

*You must use one or all of the key terms below so we can find your entry:

  • @acrartex
  • #406MHz
  • #406SurvivorClub
  • #ACRARTEX
  • “406 MHz Beacon Awareness Day”

For more information on “406 MHz Beacon Awareness Day” please contact:

Nichole Kalil, Public Relations and Media Specialist

T: +1-954-862-2180 or nichole.kalil@acrartex.com

Source: http://www.sarsat.noaa.gov/statistics.html

 


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Whats the difference between a Personal Locator Beacons and Avalanche Beacons?

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Learn more about Personal Locator Beacons

We often get asked the question; what’s the difference between an Avalanche Beacon and an ACR 406 MHz Personal Locator Beacon?

The answer essentially comes down to the fact that each beacon has 2 different jobs.  The easiest way to think about this is while both beacons are designed to aid in Search and Rescue, an avalanche beacon does the Searching, while a Personal Locator Beacon brings the Rescue.

Avalanche beacons are specifically designed to locate other 457 kHz signals buried under the snow.  An avalanche beacons is constantly transmitting a low powered pulsed signal during your skiing/snowboarding/snowmobiling trip and should you get caught in an avalanche, anyone in your party that is safe will switch their beacon from the transmitting mode to the receiving mode which allows use as a radio direction finder.   The searchers in your party use their beacons to find your location and dig you out of the snow.

Surviving the avalanche and getting out alive is the first major hurdle to overcome, but quickly your attention must turn to assessing injuries.  According to the US National Library of Medicine, the most frequent injuries are to your extremities, chest and/or spine.  Getting medical attention is imperative, but can also be extremely difficult in the backcountry depending upon your location and the extent of the injuries.  That is why a 406 MHz beacon is the perfect complimentary beacon to an avalanche beacon, it calls in the cavalry.

Avalanche sign and mountains at the backgroundAn ACR 406 MHz Personal Locator Beacon, like the ResQLink,  utilizes the Cospas-Sarsat Search and Rescue Satellite System and provides the closest Search and Rescue Agency to your vicinity with your registration data, emergency contacts and location information.  Search and Rescue (SAR) forces use the GPS position (or coordinates based on triangulation if GPS data is not available) from the beacon along with the information you provide when you properly register your beacon to immediately set out on the rescue mission.  There is no subscription or activation fees with a Personal Locator Beacon, the only thing required is mandatory registration, which is what tells SAR forces who activated the beacon.

On average, 150 people lose there lives to avalanches each year.  While predicting and avoiding avalanches are becoming more and more reliable, anyone in these areas is always still at risk and should be well-trained in avalanche safety.  For more information and safety tips on Avalanche please check out National Ski Patrol, or find an avalanche safety course in your area.

Sources:
National Geographics
US National Library of Medicine