ACR ARTEX

The Science Of Survival


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Introducing the New ARTEX ELT 1000 Emergency Locator Transmitter with Built-In GPS Navigational Interface

Fort Lauderdale, FL – ACR Electronics, Inc. announces today that the all-new ELT 1000 (Emergency Locator Transmitter) has received its Cospas-Sarsat and FAA approvals and is now available for sale. The ARTEX ELT 1000 is competitively priced and designed with multiple installation configurations to reduce overall installation cost.

The state of the art electronics maximize frequency stability and power while incorporating a new, built-in GPS navigational interface. Including GPS data in the emergency transmission allows Search and Rescue personnel to know your location within 100 meters in less than a minute. Designed to accommodate multiple installation configurations, the new ELT 1000 is a quick, easy and affordable retrofit for obsolete 121.5 MHz ELTs.

ELT100_ISO_2Built under the exacting standards of AS9100C quality certification, the ELT 1000 exceeds all government and regulatory standards including the latest FAA guidelines with its new robust stainless steel mounting strap.

The ARTEX ELT 1000 features and specifications are listed below:

  • Quick and easy retrofit for general aviation aircraft
  • Single antenna output for emergency transmission on both 406 MHz (Cospas-Sarsat) and 121.5 MHz frequencies (local Search & Rescue)
  • Enhanced positional accuracy with a built-in GPS interface that does not require aircraft power
  • Encoded digital message broadcasts aircraft identification/registration and owner/emergency contact details
  • New stainless steel mounting strap for increased stability that complies with the most current FAA guidelines
  • Simple self-testing from the cockpit. When combined with 406Test.com, the self-test will provide SMS/e-mail confirmation within seconds that the ELT signal reached the satellites successfully
  • New hermetically sealed G-Switch for increased reliability

ARTEX designs and manufactures an array of ELT’s, battery packs and ELT accessories. ARTEX products serve a wide category of aircrafts ranging from general aviation to the world’s leading airframe manufacturers, large commercial airlines and government aircraft.


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ACR AquaLink PLB Still Functioning After 16 Days Underwater

James Kastner recovered this ACR AquaLink PLB from his boat “Chompers” after the vessel sank during Hurricane Sandy. Despite being submerged inside the boat for 16 days, the AquaLink worked flawlessly after James turned it on and ran the self test. James said he was “amazed, but not surprised” and he thanked ACR “for making the best gear on earth!!” Thanks, James – this story is a testament to the great employees who make the ACR/Artex products!


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Hero or Pirate? French Boat’s Rescuer Seeks $200K Award

Photo: Sarah Rice, Special To The San Francisco Chronicle

The following article appeared in the October 10th edition of the San Francisco Chronicle.

Local sailor Todd Tholke is either a Good Samaritan or a high-seas pirate.

On Sept. 30, Tholke was a hero when he went out on the bay in the middle of the night to single-handedly rescue the runaway French catamaran Energy. The America’s Cup World Series boat snapped its mooring line at Piers 30-32 that night and drifted off into the darkness, unmanned and out of control. It fetched up on the rocks of Treasure Island, where it was spotted from the land by Tholke.

At 3:30 a.m., Tholke pulled it off the shore with his 14-foot Boston Whaler. He then towed it to the Treasure Isle Marina and handed it back to the racing team.

The French were so grateful they offered to give Tholke a ride on the bay.

But Friday, as the French prepared for the regatta, Tholke’s representatives presented them with a warrant from U.S. District Court to “arrest” the boat and take it into custody as soon as Sunday’s races were over.

Based on a law from the 1800s, Tholke’s attorney John Edgcomb said in court documents, the rescue had established “a valid maritime salvage claim” and Tholke was entitled to “a liberal maritime salvage award.” Edgcomb said the amount was up to the court, but something “in excess of $200,000.”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE


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The Mystery of the Giant Eyeball Finally Solved…??

This is the giant mystery eyeball that washed ashore near Pompano Beach, FL last week....

The top trending topics on the Internet the past few days have centered around the stories of two orbs – one celestial (did you hear about the skydiver who was hoping to safely land on the blue and green orb we live on?) and the other, well, of unknown origin. It’s the story of a giant, mysterious eyeball that washed up on the shore in Pompano Beach, FL. Experts from all over weighed in, and most guessed that it was likely from a giant squid, a large billfish or a really big shark (megalodons are still extinct, right?). It now appears the mystery is solved. After several days of careful study, the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission believes they know which animal the eyeball belongs to:

After examining an eye found on a south Florida beach this week, researchers from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) believe the specimen came from a swordfish. Genetic testing will be done to confirm the identification.

“Experts on site and remotely have viewed and analyzed the eye, and based on its color, size and structure, along with the presence of bone around it, we believe the eye came from a swordfish,” said Joan Herrera, curator of collections at the FWC’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute in St. Petersburg. “Based on straight-line cuts visible around the eye, we believe it was removed by a fisherman and discarded.”

The approximately softball-size eye was recovered by a citizen in Pompano Beach on Wednesday. FWC staff received the eye later that day. Swordfish are commonly fished in the Florida Straits offshore of south Florida at this time of year.

A highly migratory fish, swordfish can be found from the surface to as deep as 2,000 feet. Swordfish in the Atlantic can reach a maximum size of over 1,100 pounds, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Swordfish feed on a wide variety of fish and invertebrates.

…and this is a close-up photo of a large swordfish. Mystery solved?

Was this your guess??


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Win an ACR ResQLink+ PLB!

ACR is giving away a ResQLink+ Personal Locator Beacon. To enter the sweepstakes, CLICK ON THIS LINK and “Like” the ACR/Artex Facebook Page. The, just fill in your name and email address and you are entered!

The contest closes 9/30/12. The winner will be announced on 10/1/12 on our Fscebook Page. Limit one (1) entry per person, per month.


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Coast Guard Rescues Father, Son From Sinking Plane

 

NOTE: The following story appears courtesy of ABC News.

A single-engine amphibious plane that lost power off California’s central coast plunged into the ocean so hard, its doors broke off the hinges, one of the two men onboard said Monday.

The 77-year-old pilot and his adult son then sat in the aircraft in seas swelling with 8-foot waves and teeming with elephant seals for nearly two hours before a Coast Guard helicopter hoisted them to safety and their pontoon plane sank.

Stanley Shaw and son Stanford Shaw, 36, were flying at 1,500 feet over the ocean Sunday afternoon about five miles north of San Simeon when the aircraft lost power.

The Cessna 185 Skywagon pontoon plane, a six-seater the Shaws have owned for 20 years, was carrying the men from Camarillo Airport to British Columbia for an annual salmon fishing excursion in Canada.

“We flew it two hours without a problem, then there was a loss of power,” Stanford Shaw told The Associated Press from his Santa Barbara home.

“It was pretty big seas,” he said. “We hit three times. It broke the doors off the hinges. We hit the first time and bounced way up in the air. We hit again and on the third one, we hit like a belly flop.”

The plane’s beacon alerted rescuers to the aircraft’s whereabouts a mile offshore.

CLICK HERE to read the full article.