ACR ARTEX

The Science Of Survival


1 Comment

Len & Lisa, ACR Survivors Use TWO Beacons for TWO Different Rescues

Image

ACR Electronics shares a first: within just six months a SurvivorClub replacement Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB) saves a crew of three and their dog from the raging seas of the North Atlantic.

Just this past October, and without warning, Len and Lisa Rorke’s sailboat rudder broke and drifted away leaving the sailboat without any means of steering, forcing Len to activate their EPIRB. Their ACR GlobalFix iPRO EPIRB signal was received by the USCG who coordinated their rescue with a local fishing trawler which was 20 miles away. The good Samaritans aboard the trawler pulled the Rorkes, and their Jack Russell Terrier, Dexter, up on board and took them back to safety.

To everyone’s shock and disbelief not even six months later, lightning struck again. This time the couple, Dexter and a crew mate Henri Worthalter were 13 days into crossing the Atlantic Ocean, from the Turks and Caicos Islands, heading to the Mediterranean via The Azores. Their journey ended with two days of gale force winds and high seas which broke the rudder and aft bulkhead on their sailboat,The Blue Pearl. “We were 950 nautical miles from the Azores (about halfway between the Azores and Bermuda), and could not have been further from land if we tried. We had been battling heavy weather for a week and the last two days of storms battered our boat so badly that it sank right in the middle of the North Atlantic in huge seas, strong winds and in the dead of night”, stated Len, Captain of The Blue Pearl.

ImageForced into a life raft 900 miles north of Bermuda, the couple watched as their home sank before their eyes.  As fate would have it, their new EPIRB given to them just months before by ACR Electronics as part of the SurvivorClub program was put to proper use.  They activated the EPIRB once they got into their life raft and within minutes the EPIRB sent the USCG the exact location of the displaced crew.

The USCG District Command Center located two ships to help with the rescue the Tilda Kosan, a 351′ tanker, which was 32 nautical miles to the south of their position and an automated mutual-assistance vessel rescue ship (AMVER). The tanker reported they were six hours away from the EPIRB’s location and would divert off course to assist the distressed mariners. Around 12:30 a.m. the tanker located the life raft with Len, Lisa, Henri and Dexter whom the USCG previously identified.

Clearly relieved, Len said “We were extremely lucky to have survived but that luck came because we did everything right and without a question because we had properly registered our EPIRB, once again, with the US Coast Guard.”

Rescued, recovered but now homeless, the Rorkes are in good and grateful spirits despite watching their sailboat, their home just drop to the bottom of the ocean.  Their crewmate, Henri returned home to Europe but the Rorkes and Dexter were transported to Bermuda and then flown into South Florida. Currently they are residing at a good Samaritan’s home in Jupiter, FL while regrouping and raising money to join their family in the United Kingdom.

To read both of the Rorke’s survival stories please visit SurvivorClub.com.

Image

Advertisements


1 Comment

ACR EPIRB Onboard HMS Bounty Outlives 48 Hour Specs

 

The following article appears courtesy of Ocean Navigator

“HMS Bounty EPIRB Outlives 48 Hour Specs”

By Tim Queeny

The ACR Satellite 2 406 EPIRB that was turned on at 9 pm on Sunday night by the crew of the tall ship Bounty was reportedly not recovered during the rescue operation. And at the time of this writing the EPIRB is floating in the Atlantic, still transmitting. The unit has outlived its Coast Guard 48 hour at -4° F specification for operation. This is perhaps one positive outcome of theBounty sinking: that you can trust an EPIRB (with a charged battery) to do its job of bringing rescuers to your position.

According to Mikele D’Arcangelo, Marketing Manager for ACR Electronics, Inc. and ARTEX, ACR aims for its products to outperform government specs. “ACR Electronics is in the business of saving lives and we are exacting, obsessive, serious and accurate in the engineering and manufacture of our products,” D’Arcangelo said. “We design our products to outperform any regulation set for us by government agencies.”

Additional Reporting:

“Coast Guard Rescues 14 During Hurricane Sandy”

The Coast Guard Compass, the official blog of the U.S. Coast Guard

“Technology Speeds Rescue at Sea”

WWAY News Channel 3


Leave a comment

USCG Swimmer Wins Prestigious Award for Rescue at Sea

The Association for Rescue at Sea, Inc. (AFRAS) will hold its annual awards ceremony and reception on 4 October 2012 on Capitol Hill.

The event will be co-hosted by the Honorable Howard Coble, co-chairman, U.S. Congressional Coast Guard Caucus. AFRAS will award the Gold Medal, the Silver Medal and the Amver (Automated Mutual-Assistance Vessel Rescue System) plaque for outstanding rescues made in 2011.

The Gold Medal and a cash prize will be presented to Randall J. Rice, Chief Warrant Officer, US Coast Guard; the Silver Medal and a cash prize will be awarded to the crew of U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Facility 25371 and the Amver plaque will go to the Captain and crew of M/V Oleander.

Chief Warrant Officer Randall J. Rice of US Coast Guard Air Station Cape Cod will receive the prestigious AFRAS Gold Medal for his heroic life-saving actions on 10 May 2011 while serving as rescue swimmer aboard Coast Guard Helicopter CG6004.

At approximately noon, Rice and his crew launched from Air Station Cape Cod in response to a distress call received from the 45-foot sailing vessel EVA, located 150 nautical miles southeast of Cape Cod. Pounding seas and gale force winds had ripped the mast off the vessel and shattered the windows endangering the lives of the crew. The surrounding waters and deck were littered with sails, lines and debris.

Arriving at an updated position relayed from a concurrently launched HU-25 Aircraft, and unable to establish communications with the vessel, Rice and his crew conducted a search to locate S/V EVA in the tossing 20-30 foot waves. Rice eventually spotted the vessel and vectored the pilot into position.

The aircraft commander initially made the decision not to deploy the rescue swimmer due to numerous hazards in the water, but after further assessment it was determined that deployment was required in order to save the two crewmen – one having sustained a back injury.

Chief Warrant Officer Rice entered the water, maneuvered through the 30-foot swells and debris to the vessel and climbed aboard. He quickly cleared the deck of rubble and prepared for two basket hoists of the crew. He meticulously executed each hoist from the deck of EVA as the thrashing waves and raging winds battered the vessel. His swift actions were instrumental in the saving of two lives.

The Association for Rescue at Sea (AFRAS) is a non-profit foundation with charitable status, which supports services concerned with saving lives at sea. Other awards to be presented at the ceremony include the Silver Medal, and the AFRAS AMVER Award.


Leave a comment

Coast Guard Rescues Father, Son From Sinking Plane

 

NOTE: The following story appears courtesy of ABC News.

A single-engine amphibious plane that lost power off California’s central coast plunged into the ocean so hard, its doors broke off the hinges, one of the two men onboard said Monday.

The 77-year-old pilot and his adult son then sat in the aircraft in seas swelling with 8-foot waves and teeming with elephant seals for nearly two hours before a Coast Guard helicopter hoisted them to safety and their pontoon plane sank.

Stanley Shaw and son Stanford Shaw, 36, were flying at 1,500 feet over the ocean Sunday afternoon about five miles north of San Simeon when the aircraft lost power.

The Cessna 185 Skywagon pontoon plane, a six-seater the Shaws have owned for 20 years, was carrying the men from Camarillo Airport to British Columbia for an annual salmon fishing excursion in Canada.

“We flew it two hours without a problem, then there was a loss of power,” Stanford Shaw told The Associated Press from his Santa Barbara home.

“It was pretty big seas,” he said. “We hit three times. It broke the doors off the hinges. We hit the first time and bounced way up in the air. We hit again and on the third one, we hit like a belly flop.”

The plane’s beacon alerted rescuers to the aircraft’s whereabouts a mile offshore.

CLICK HERE to read the full article.


Leave a comment

Satellite Technology Increases Chance of Survival

Did you know that over 30,000 lives have been saved since search and rescue began using the COSPAS-SARSAT satellite-aided tracking program?
That number could have been much higher if more mariners, aviators and hikers had been outfitted with a rescue beacon…

Check out this great article by Ed Killer from TCPalm.com

COSPAS-SARSAT Rescues through August 30, 2012

Number of People Rescued in Calendar Year 2012 in the United States: 170

  • Rescues at sea: 119 people rescued in 37 incidents
  • Aviation rescues:  13 people rescued in 8 incidents
  • Terrestrial PLB rescues:   38 person rescued in 26 incidents
  • WorldwideOver 30,000+ People Rescued  (since 1982)
  • United States – 6,907 People Rescued  (since 1982)

Total Rescues in Calendar Year 2011 in the United States: 207

  • Rescues at sea:  122 people rescued in 40 incidents
  • Aviation rescues:  14 people rescued in 6 incidents
  • PLB rescues:  71 people rescued in 42 incidents


Leave a comment

Five fishermen Rescued

Five fishermen were rescued from the mouth of the Mississippi River after their vessel struck a jetty. “Because of the EPIRB, we were able to vector-in right where they were located to the bar pilots,” said Lt. Cliff Beard, command duty officer for the 8th District. “An EPIRB provides our search-and-rescue coordinators with vital information such as phone numbers and the description and type of vessel, which allows us to effect a rescue much quicker.”


Leave a comment

Air Station Kodiak Rescues 3 Fishermen

USCG Jayhawk

The brave crew of a USCG Jayhawk helicopter from Air Station Kodiak

The crew of a USCG Jayhawk helicopter from Air Station Kodiak rescued three fishermen after responding to an EPIRB signal 14 miles offshore. Prior to arriving on scene, there was no communication with the crew and the boat had already sunk. A 4th crew member is missing but thanks to the alert from the vessel’s EPIRB three men survived.

News Articles:

Alaska Dispatch
KMXT 100.1 FM Radio